Blue Apron · News · Tips and Tricks

Finally! @BlueApron offers packaging return

Whenever someone asks me about the pros and cons of Blue Apron, I always tell them: it’s a cost effective, high quality, fun ingredient-delivery service to supplement your weekly meal planning, but it’s really hard to stomach all the packaging. They describe themselves as anti-waste because they only ship the exact amount of food you need for each meal, but with everything in its own box, bag or carton, it does feel as if you’re throwing away a lot of garbage as you cook. They’ve long had instructions on their website for breaking down and recycling the shipping and packing materials, but after trying all those suggested steps just once, I decided it was too labor-intensive and time-consuming for even a die-hard recycle-er. So I gave up, put the cardboard shipping box out with our paper goods on trash day, and threw away everything else. Until now!

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Enter the new Blue Apron package return system.

There are two options:you can still follow this guide to recycling the packaging at home, or you can send all the packing materials back to them at no charge for reuse and recycling on their end. This page has detailed instructions on how that second option works. We are definitely going to do this, especially since the shipping is covered by Blue Apron if you wait to send back two weeks worth of packing materials at a time. All you have to do is create a mailing label on their website.

It won’t solve the problem of how long it takes to clean all those little baggies properly for recycling, but it will take care of the worst offenders — the large freezer bag and jumbo reusable ice packs that I’ve had no choice but to thaw and discard up until now.

What do you think? Does this change your mind about Blue Apron? Read my initial thoughts on the service here, and check out a couple Blue Apron recipes here and hereAnd have a great week! 

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4 thoughts on “Finally! @BlueApron offers packaging return

  1. I don’t understand why people think this is a solution. Critics of recycling as an overall waste reducer often cite the energy and resources consumed in maintaining a functioning, scaled recycling system. I’ve always been skeptical of that criticism (possibly reducing the volume of waste is valuable, even if it consumes more resources), but shipping my garbage in small batches so it can be recycled just seems like a comical waste of resources.

    I was really disappointed that they didn’t make it a pickup cycle, like many CSAs do, where the delivery person for your next box will also take your waste. This is obviously a much better use of delivery resources. I keep hoping someone knowledgeable will actually do the math. How environmentally damaging is all of this shipping?

    Like

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