organicglory

simple nibbles of natural goodness

Have a Happy Memorial Day Weekend!

Lucky us: Mark’s show closes Sunday and we both have Monday off, so it actually IS a long weekend in our house. Georgia moved up to the toddler room at day care (sob) where she is eating at a preschool table with miniature chairs, napping for three hours a day, learning Montessori works and bonding with a more intimate group of classmates. She also did her first somersault last weekend so we are signing her up for toddler gymnastics. Where did my baby go??

IMG_0032

We are visiting with Mark’s Grandfather, a World War II veteran, this weekend and probably cooking out at his house in New Bedford (the onetime whaling capital of the world, still a major fishing port). In fact, if you’re ever in the area, New Bedford has a world-class whaling museum, historical waterfront and even a zoo!

Are you grilling at home or with friends, too? When you have the basics covered, here are my picks for what to serve on the side, at dessert and as appetizers.

Homemade Restaurant-Style Salsa

Slow Cooker Brown Sugar Kielbasa

(Vegan) Spinach and Artichoke Dip (serve with the homemade pita chips in my salsa recipe, above)

Pillsbury Sausage Party Bites

Refreshing Basil Lemonade

Pimm’s Cup (for the adults!)

Apple-Fennel Slaw

Meatball Pizza (cook it on the grill!)

Belgian Salad (a cold, tangy vegetable salad that doesn’t spoil if kept outdoors all day)

Strawberry Rhubarb Crumble (what a crowd pleaser!)

Orange Creamsicle Cake (egg-free! with whipped cream…mmm)

It isn’t exactly hot out yet, but to be ready, I just ordered Georgia this awesome-looking water park table (!!!) Can’t wait to see her with it when the dog days of summer hit.

Have a wonderful weekend, everyone! Enjoy the outdoors, friends, family and food. xoxo

********************************************

Sneaking veggies into food (with toddler-friendly risotto recipe)

Well, I suppose it was inevitable: the day where my toddler figured out junk food exists in the world, and that she’d prefer to eat cookies, fruit juice and Kraft Macaroni & Cheese than mom’s home cooking. Hoping it’s just a short-lived phase, I’ve adapted by sneaking in greens where I can and holding a firm line on her requests to snack the day away. “More?” “Cookie!” and “Mine” are her new favorite words, especially when pointing to mom’s coffee, a bag of fruit snacks or (cringe) the drive-through menu.

There are a couple key things I’ve done to get through this temporary eating issue.

One is to make smoothies with greens like celery and lettuce blended in, since they add nutrients without turning the flavor detectably non-fruity.

Secondly, we’ve gone back to sending fruit & veggie pouches to daycare for snack time. She sucks them down as readily as her applesauce pouches without realizing there are greens mixed in with those pears and apples.

Since she loves mac n’ cheese so much, I’ve tried to make my own more often, and to buy better boxed versions from Trader Joe’s and Annie’s — as well as to mix in peas, diced green beans or broccoli, since covering them with cheese seems to get her to accept more veggies. 

I also shredded carrots into my homemade marinara, and she was none the wiser.

Finally, last week I realized I had a very adaptable recipe in my arsenal: risotto. By finely dicing carrots, onions, celery and celery greens with cut up sweet chicken-apple sausage, and swirling in a spoon full of low-fat cream cheese right at the end, I made a toddler-friendly version of one of our favorite dishes.

IMG_9955

IMG_9981

She not only finished some off of our plates, she ate it by herself for lunch the next day, and even scooped a handful out of my bag while I was packing up leftovers to take to work! So we know it’s a keeper.

Here are my other two favorite risotto recipes:

An important note: I do choose to leave in the step with white wine, even while cooking for Georgia, because it’s a critical component to the final texture of the arborio rice. However, omitting it won’t ruin the dish completely, if that’s what you’d prefer to do.

In other news, Mark and Georgia planted our garden this weekend! This year, we are having strawberries, peas, tomatoes and basil:

IMG_0007

IMG_0006

IMG_0008

This is a kid who loves getting her hands dirty! I went online pretty much right away and ordered her this gardening play set from Green Toys, and already it’s a huge hit. She loves to help daddy with the soil, seeds and plants!

green_toys_watering_can

Have a great week everyone and get out there to enjoy some nice weather now that it’s here to stay :)

The cutest guide to baby food, birth to 12 months

I recently stumbled across the most darling illustrated guide to feeding your baby in their first year on Along Abbey Road, and I simply had to share it. It makes me so happy! And, it’s completely useful. What she lays out here is pretty much month-for-month exactly what we introduced and when, and I feel really good about how we started Georgia on solids and transitioned her to table food when she was ready. 

alongabbeyroad.com

alongabbeyroad.com

So what comes next, after babies turn one?

At 12 months we started mixing whole milk into her formula (she had weaned from breast milk at 9 months) in graduating ratios until she was completely on “big girl” milk & solid foods. She started refusing purees right around 9 months anyway, so she was exactly on the timetable you see above when it comes to introducing more table foods. We started off cutting up our meals into really small pieces (rotisserie chicken, green beans, spaghetti, etc.) and then making the pieces larger as her coordination and number of teeth grew. She always has had an adventurous taste for things that are spicy, tart or unusual, so we were lucky there; we just had to help teach her how to take bites, “chew chew chew,” and bend her elbow to spoon things like mashed potatoes and stew into her mouth. All in all, it went fairly seamlessly and it was exciting to watch her grow and develop! The only real hiccups we had were between months 15 and 18 when she really struggled to feed herself with utensils, and got so frustrated (and messy) trying! Now, she’s an expert.

IMG_9738

See some of Georgia’s favorites from year one, and check out the first time we gave her baby oatmeal — her first food — right here. These days, she eats what we do, and the leftovers go to daycare for lunch.

Favorites include bananas, raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, pineapple, mango, apples, pears, orange slices, vanilla yogurt, dried fruit, macaroni & cheese, dumpling soup, chicken and mushroom casserole, croissants, omelettes, pancakes, bacon, cheddar, jalapeno cheese, pretzels, pizza, granola bars, applesauce, smoothies, lemonade, ice cream, ravioli, meatballs, pesto tortellini, corn bread, naan, scrambled eggs, risotto, peanut butter crackers, donuts and chocolate chip cookies.

Clearly she’s growing — just look at her now!

I still can’t tell whether she’s going to be a righty or lefty since she switches hands every time she eats, and we are still working on the dexterity for foods like broth-based soup and fruits with the skin on. But it’s so fun to give her new things, and great to be able to go out to restaurants and order off the menu as a family without having to pack special snacks just for her! Plus, the older she’s getting, the more she likes “helping” me in the kitchen, which is super fun. To think I once couldn’t cook and didn’t know if I’d ever have kids!

such a pro, she's now feeding others!

such a pro, she’s feeding others!

Interested in Georgia’s mealtime accessories? We love our Ikea high chair with tray, which is priced right, portable, and unbelievably easy to clean; this Playtex sippy cup set; this Oxo Tot toddler flatware with easy-to-grip training handles; and this Skip Hop plate set, which was a favorite 1st birthday gift from a friend and comes in many “animal” pattern options. Bibs are also from Ikea and she loves this spill-proof snack container from Oxo Tot, too.

Have you tried Blue Apron?

I know I’m late to the trend! But a couple weeks ago I finally got to give Blue Apron a try, thanks to a friend who couldn’t cook her order before leaving for vacation.  And I have to say, it was absolutely delicious, and I felt like it broke me out of my usual recipe rut. I never cook something with this many ingredients these days, and the flavors were so much more complex than what I typically end up making for weeknight dinners. Overall, I’m definitely a fan and am considering signing up.

IMG_9584

What I made

The recipe I got was for Roasted Japanese Sweet Potatoes with Miso-Dressed Spinach and Candied Cashews. YUM.

The ingredients included two sweet potatoes, brown rice, baby spinach, scallions, sesame oil, sugar, fresh ginger, miso (fermented soybean) paste, cashews, mirin (rice wine) and a spice blend.

Everything comes labeled, packaged for freshness, and with picture-heavy step-by-step directions.

IMG_9587

How it works

Blue Apron delivers original recipes with ingredients pre-portioned alongside step-by-step directions. It is designed so that both experienced and novice cooks can take part, and menus change seasonally. Blue Apron work with hundreds of farms to source quality ingredients, which they say stay fresher longer than what you get at the supermarket. You can pick your recipes, including family-friendly options, and deliveries are booked around your schedule. According to their website, their main value add is offering specialty ingredients you might not otherwise be able to try, at a better value than shopping at your local grocery store. Competitors include HelloFreshPlated and Din (currently just CA and NV but expanding nationally soon).

Pros

  • Everything comes pre-measured and portioned, so there’s minimal prep work involved (I had to slice some scallions and sweet potatoes for my dish; otherwise everything was ready to go) and zero food waste.
  • If you really don’t know how to cook much at all, this can teach you! It’s that easy to follow. They also have tutorials for specific techniques (mince, caramelize, etc.) on their website.
  • You can adjust the portion size for each order. I found that the two-person order I cooked left me with enough for two filling dinners and some leftovers for lunch, too.
  • Expands your child’s palate, if you share with them; gets you out of the usual rotation of recipes we all fall into.
  • Customizable for any dietary preferences. Especially for vegetarians, this will introduce you to some original new recipe ideas.
  • Delivery is free and arrives refrigerated in case you aren’t home.
  • Recipes are seasonal and healthy (between 500 and 700 calories) and are designed to be ready in about half an hour.
  • The quality of the ingredients seems top notch — mine lasted several days after I received them in the fridge, even the greens, and still tasted great.
  • Allows you to cook with specialty ingredients that would otherwise be too pricy or hard to find.

IMG_9597

IMG_9599

Cons

  • The convenience of having things pre-measured means lots of packaging, which felt a tad wasteful.
  • I found that the time estimate — 35 minutes — was ambitious. While the timing of the instructions (“preheat the oven, then chop X ingredient, then while that’s cooking, candy the cashews,” etc.) was accurate and helpful if followed literally, the overall start-to-finish time frame was more like an hour because I had to re-read techniques I wasn’t familiar with, double check that I hadn’t missed anything, and just take it slow simply because it was an unfamiliar recipe.
  • While it’s great to learn new skills (I had never candied nuts, for example) I had the benefit of trying Blue Apron on a weekend night after Georgia’s bedtime. This would have been WAY too chaotic for a weeknight dinner with a toddler underfoot. Alone? Forget about it, unless your kiddo is big enough to help or at least watch safely.
  • This is nit-picking, but the cleanup from using every burner on my stovetop, several pots, pans, and the oven was substantial.  I’m sure if you have a dishwasher this won’t bother you too much, but for me and my small kitchen, cooking something with this many ingredients absolutely took over the joint and took ages to clean up by hand.
  • Expensive. Three meals for two people every week is $60, and weekly is the only interval for shipping they offer. You can skip any week or cancel any time, but it would be nice if you could get just one meal a week or two meals a month, etc. For a family of four, the price jumps to $140 for four meals per week ($70 for two meals).

IMG_9601

Bottom Line

My overall take on this is that, if you love cooking but don’t have the time to pick up lots of specialty ingredients or you’re trying to break out of a rut and gain some new ideas or skills, this is fabulous. I felt like I could easily handle the cooking and plating instructions, and got to experience a flavor profile I never would have tackled on my own. It’s not a meal or grocery delivery service, though, and it really shouldn’t be used for dinner every night of the week. You could eat out at a casual sit-down restaurant or order take-out and pay less! Lastly, although we didn’t do it this way because Mark works nights, I’d imagine this would be fun for couples to do together.

How about you — have you tried one of these services? What’s your take?

psst! A couple last-minute Mother’s Day deals for you. My favorite cardigan is on super sale at Nordstrom, and ThredUp is having 15% off sitewide with code MAMASDAY15. Good luck shopping and have a wonderful Mother’s Day!

Mother’s Day is next week! #giftideas

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again because I’m totally not joking: all I want for Mother’s Day is some extra sleep! I’m not holding my breath though :)

Take a look at my first Mother’s Day one year ago, when G was 8 months old, and here’s what we cooked two years ago.

Thank God, she still has those fat little ankles and nibble-able feet. But she’s a whole lot bigger these days!

IMG_9541

IMG_9679

I’m so thankful for everyone in my family being happy and healthy that I truly can’t think of a better gift for Mother’s Day. I would say that just spending the day together is enough, but as usual Mark has to work every weekend this month, so probably my “gift” will be entertaining a toddler solo and praying for nice weather so we can get outdoors! I’ll take a rain check for a pedicure and the chance to pick dinner at a place only I like (hello, Mexican food!) Speaking of which, check out Georgia chugging an entire TigerNut Horchata I’d planned on drinking myself:

OrganicGemini Horchata review coming soon!

Getting ready for Cinco de Mayo a week early!

So, what are some Mother’s Day gift ideas? Well, apart from sending cards to all the women in my life, here are a few things that caught my eye, both food-related and non.

ceramic macaroni necklace//food52.com

monogram-able transport tote//madewell.com

grandmother bracelet, Alex and Ani//thepaperstore.com

santa barbara design//nordstrom.com

*Nordstrom is offering free delivery by Mother’s Day for all orders placed by 11 p.m. ET tonight, April 30.

english garden lounge pant//anthropologie.com

a pampering serum//amazon.com

edgy mom? ear jacket//etsy.com

funny new personal essay collection//amazon.com

whisk necklace//food52.com

I know I’ve also got my eye on these pants and just bought myself these sandals for my birthday (which is today)! And if those sandals don’t scream “mom” then I don’t know what does :)

Have a wonderful weekend everyone!

How to Revive Stale Cookies

Don’t you hate it when someone makes you homemade cookies and you don’t have time to eat them all?

Yeah, that never happens to me either.

IMG_9171

But I did recently have a huge batch of cookies left over from a get-together that was cancelled at the last minute, and I stuck them in the fridge where they didn’t spoil…but then they didn’t stay soft and chewy, either. So I adapted a trick I’d heard a long time ago for re-moistening stale bread, which calls for using your microwave and a glass of water, and found it to be a sure-fire way to bring hard cookies back to life. Pin it for later, you won’t be sorry!

IMG_9494

All you do is place the stale cookie on a paper towel in the microwave next to a small glass of water. Heat for 30 seconds, see if it’s reached desired softness, and go for another 10 or 20 seconds if not. Voila! Moist, chewy cookies can be yours again, no matter when the goodies were baked or how long they’ve been hanging out in the refrigerator. This also works for stale bread, as I mentioned above, as well as hard pizza crusts and any other starch that’s turned hard and inedible. Enjoy!

Looking for a good cookie recipe? Don’t miss the easy Martha Stewart 5-Ingredient Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe in my last post!

Michelle’s Stuffed Mushrooms

By popular demand, I’ve got Michelle, my brother’s girlfriend and an awesome cook, to guest blog about how she makes her easy yet delicious stuffed mushrooms. They’ve been a staple at our holiday celebrations this year, and are truly addictive! Interested in finding out how she makes this healthy dish? Keep reading!

IMG_9376

Michelle’s Famous Stuffed Mushrooms

INGREDIENTS

  • White mushrooms, 3 or 4 packages
  • Plain bread crumbs, any brand
  • Butter (5 TBSP total)

DIRECTIONS

The number of people you are planning to serve determines how many packages of mushrooms to buy. I buy the white mushrooms that still have the stems attached. For Christmas, when we had 12 guests, I got four packages, and for Easter I got three. It may seem like a lot, but remember that mushrooms shrink! I also use the 4C Plain Bread Crumbs but you can use your favorite kind.

Usually the night before I am going to make them, I take the stems out and I save about 10 of them. Then I wash all the mushrooms to make sure I have all the dirt off, and put them back in the fridge. (Don’t forget to wash the stems too!)

IMG_9374

To make them, I get a pot of boiling water and put the mushrooms in the water for 5 minutes. Make sure not to leave them in any longer then that! I have a limited amount of large pots in my house so I boiled them in three batches, and it works well either way. Then use a (clean) towel and put them facing down so the water doesn’t pool. Then, you want to use the stems: chop them up very fine and use about 1-2 tablespoons of butter (it can be salted or unsalted). I use salted butter for mine. Have the butter melt in the frying pan then put your stems in and let them cook until they get a deeper brown color. Make sure to keep stirring them so they don’t burn. That usually takes about 3 to 5 minutes on medium heat.

In a bowl, have your bread crumbs ready. The amount will vary depending on how many mushrooms you have. I used a little less than a cup. If you’re making more mushrooms, then add more breadcrumbs. Once the stems are done cooking you add those in with your bread crumbs.

IMG_9375

You will need to melt about 2-3 more tablespoons of butter (just use the same frying pan you cooked the stems in) and once that is melted add that to your bread crumbs and mix it all up until it kind of looks like wet sand. (You can do a taste test here ~ I promise you it doesn’t taste like sand!) You just want to make sure that all the breadcrumbs are coated.

**At this time if you wanted, you could add whatever spices you like, for example garlic powder, cheese, onion powder, etc. You can get creative, but I keep things plain.**

Now time for stuffing! I have a large round glass dish that I like to cook my mushrooms in. By this time they will be cooled from being boiled so just move them into whatever dish you baking them in and stuff them! I use a small spoon and make sure I really pack the stuffing into each mushroom by using the back of the spoon. You will more than likely have a little left over stuffing, so that’s what I sprinkle over the top. Put them in the oven at 350F for about 20-25 minutes (or until the stuffing looks golden brown) and that’s it! Very easy and delicious!

Thanks, Michelle! We are so glad to have you sharing your recipe with us by popular demand, and can’t wait to see what you cook up next :)

Why we’re going nuts about almonds

Last week, Georgia had her (very belated) 18-month checkup. In addition to hearing that my baby who once wouldn’t gain weight is now in the 65th percentile (!), I was thrilled to get the green light on introducing almond milk and other nut products to her diet. Why? Because, pre-Georgia, that was all we used! We were not milk (or even really dairy) consumers, and buying three cartons of cow’s milk every week has honestly been one of the weirdest adjustments for me to make when grocery shopping. We always follow her pediatrician’s directions on food, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been excited about the prospect of one day trying things like sushi, tofu, smoothies, natural nut butters and almond milk together, which I always loved before having her.

she's a growing girl who needs her protein!

she’s a growing girl with an appetite to match!

New evidence, which our pediatrician pointed to, shows that children who are exposed to peanut products earlier in life may have a lowered risk of developing allergies later on. That, in combination with their nutritional value, is why our doctor encouraged us to offer Georgia all varieties of nut butters, flours, milks and crackers at home, now that she’s at an age where she can tolerate it. And I’m always excited to offer her new things to expand her palate.

Not quite what I had in mind...

Not quite what I had in mind…

When we gave her almond butter on apples and bananas, and made her a berry shake by pureeing frozen fruit with almond milk this week, she loved it! Now there’s so much more I can’t wait to try. And there are great reasons we use almond products beyond just the taste and the fact that I, like so many people, can’t digest lactose, or that eliminating cow’s milk (while adding exercise) has helped Mark resolve his once-serious acid reflux.

another new food buddy?

making new food buddies every day!

They are a great source of protein, which is important if you or your child eat little to no meat, and they are loaded with healthy fats, fiber, fewer calories than cow’s milk, and powerful antioxidants. By including plenty of calcium from sources like organic, low-sugar yogurt and real cheddar cheese in your toddler’s diet, you can confidently replace some of their cow’s milk with almond milk every day.

nuts

What are some of the ways we use almonds, almond butter, almond milk, and almond flour in our home?

  • A post-workout shake that I created for Mark
  • A creamy, green, fruit smoothie for breakfast
  • An afternoon pick-me-up while at work: I keep raw almonds and walnuts in my drawer at all times!
  • This pasta dish with kale
  • These tasty breakfast Muffins
  • This better-for-you baked Mac n’ Cheese
  • As a substitute for pricey pine nuts in Classic Pesto
  • To make gluten-free treats for friends with dietary restrictions, since almond flour is naturally free of gluten and can seamlessly sub for wheat flour in baking recipes
  • In lieu of cow’s milk as a drink or in almost any recipe. I blend almond milk with one banana and a dash of cinnamon for Georgia, and she loves it!

Pioneer Woman’s Apple-Nut Butter Delights: click photo for recipe

We also love Martha Stewart’s Five-Ingredient Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, which uses 1 cup almond butter, 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, 1/2 cup packed brown sugar, 2 large eggs and 1/2 tsp coarse salt. You mix together the almond butter, chocolate chips, sugar, eggs and salt until a dough forms, preheat the oven to 350, drop tablespoon-sized dollops of dough about an inch apart onto a parchment lined baking sheet, and bake for 10 minutes or until the cookies puff up and the tops are set. After cooling on a wire rack, you can store these in an airtight container for up to three days!

I’m so glad Georgia been an adventurous eater so far, and I can’t wait to keep discovering new foods together.

Nuts.com gave me the opportunity to share this infographic on the health benefits of almonds here on OrganicGlory. As with all such posts, opinions are my own, and I never endorse anything my family doesn’t already love. Please check with your doctor or pediatrician to make sure you follow their guidelines on when and how to introduce nuts to your family diet.

mac n' cheese and apples: still our two favorites.

mac n’ cheese and apples: still our two favorites.

How about you — how do you cook, bake and snack with Almonds or other nuts? Do your kiddos like them? 

Split Pea Soup

OK, finding dried peas was IMPOSSIBLE this week, which is why this post is so late. Am I crazy, or is making Split Pea Soup with your leftover holiday ham bone not a thing anymore? At Christmas and Easter my relatives usually fight over the thing on their way out the door, and having pea soup for lunch all week is supposed to be a post-holiday treat, not a chore. Poor Mark went to three different stores for me before finding a one-pound bag of regular old Goya dried beans yesterday. Trader Joe’s and Target said they don’t even carry peas at all, so this isn’t a case of stores running out because everyone else wanted to make pea soup, too.

IMG_9503

My mom always made a wicked good pea soup, but her memory of the recipe was approximate, so I decided to use a good old fashioned Betty Crocker recipe for this Split Pea Soup. My mom does not use celery or carrots in hers, but I wanted to try that and see how I liked it. I think it worked, so I’ll probably do that again the next time I make it.

IMG_9514

It came out delectable, if I do say so myself!

SPLIT PEA SOUP

Ingredients

  • 1 pound dried split peas, sorted and rinsed
  • 8 cups water
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 medium celery stalks, finely chopped
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1 ham bone (or 2 pounds shanks)
  • 3 medium carrots, cut into 1/4-inch slices

Directions

Heat the peas and the water to boiling in a 4-quart Dutch oven. Boil uncovered for 2 minutes, then remove from heat. Cover and let stand for 1 hour.

Stir in the onion, celery, carrots and pepper. Add the ham bone. Heat to boiling and reduce heat. Cover and simmer about 1 hour 30 minutes, or until peas are tender.

You can either remove the ham bone trim and off the excess fat, and then chop some ham from the bone and place into the soup, or leave the bone in the soup and cut off some pieces with scissors, like I did, then remove and discard.

Heat to boiling again, then reduce heat and cover. Simmer about 30 minutes more or until the soup is your desired consistency.

Skim the fat at this point, or later before serving (that’s what I did). Serve warm with toast or a salad. IMG_9517

Start to finish, this took just over 3 hours, most of it simmer time. I started right after putting Georgia to bed Friday night and finished up right in time for ME to go to bed, at 10:30. I put portions into takeout containers for me to have lunches all week. If you make this in a cast iron Dutch oven, it may take quite a while to cool down completely, so I’d recommend storing in a separate container. It will look much more liquid-y when you first stop cooking and then it’ll solidify overnight, which is how long I like to let it sit before eating.

Betty Crocker’s Tips include:

How to sort and rinse peas. Preparing split peas for cooking is easy, BC says! “Just pick over the dried split peas and discard any grit or discolored peas. Place the split peas in a bowl, and cover them with water. After a minute or two, remove any skins or split peas that float to the top. Finally, rinse the split peas in a colander.”

What to do if you have no ham bone? “If you’re looking for another option for a ham bone, use 2 pounds of smoked pork hocks.”

How to eat this. Like you need the help. “Serve this hearty soup with warm crusty bread and a fresh green salad drizzled with raspberry vinaigrette. Mmm!” Adorable.

IMG_9505

Nutrition Per Serving: 170 Calories, Total Fat 2g, Cholesterol 15 mg, Sodium 30 mg, Carbohydrate 33g, Fiber 13g(!), Protein 17 g.

The Easter Bunny Came! {+ our new fave camera}

Hope everyone had a nice holiday weekend! We had a wonderful Easter. Georgia not only wore her bonnet the whole day, to my complete surprise she also hunted for eggs rather enthusiastically! My brother hid plastic eggs (with stickers inside) around our house for her to “find,” and she loved it so much we had to keep running behind her to re-hide them in new places. It was adorable.

IMG_9380

IMG_9360

IMG_9385

Daddy had to work, so Georgia and Mommy went to church, where we stood on ours chairs to better see the special musicians, and then played with our friends in the nursery downstairs. Then we went home and Georgia took a nice long nap while Mommy made a glazed ham, and pretty soon Grammie, Uncle Brent and Auntie Michelle came over and we all ate a nice big dinner! Daddy made it home just in time for baby’s bedtime.

IMG_9323

IMG_9342

The ham came out great — even G ate it, and loved it! — and I’ve got a Split Pea Soup queued up for the ham bone later this week. I’ll be posting my recipe on the blog as soon as I can! In the meantime, it’s back to work, and crossing my fingers for continued warm weather so we can start our garden, plant some flowers, and enjoy our front porch. 

IMG_9379

My brother’s girlfriend brought the coolest camera to capture the fun  yesterday: the FujiFilm Instax, which is like an old-school Polaroid that develops instantly.

Georgia was a little freaked out by the photo popping right out of the top (she’s only ever seen an iPhone camera, remember!) but quickly got the hang of it and loved seeing her pictures right away. I might have to get one of these things.

She was so into the pictures that she barely wanted to look at the Easter Basket Grammie brought her! She did, however, pause long enough to eat an entire Lindt Chocolate bunny. What can I say? She has good taste. Hope you all have a great week, and stay tuned for my Split Pea Soup recipe! 

Post Navigation

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,124 other followers

%d bloggers like this: